Call Me Stormy

Finding righteous currents in turbulent times

Archive for the category “Moving Pictures”

Forgotten Silent Film

Here is a newly rediscovered silent film from 1905 that’s been cleaned, colorized and remastered by Eyefilm in the Netherlands. The original work was from France, and known as Le Dejeuner De Minet, or The Pussycat’s Breakfast. Much has been learned about the comedy, but we still do not know who directed the picture or the name of the young girl who has a starring role, alongside a cat.

 

Back To Future’s Deep Meaning

The following video montage from the iconic Back to the Future movie demonstrated a stunningly deeper meaning of time travel, which up to this point was missed in the feature film.

Other channels have discovered different anomalies in the flick, such as the “blind 11” connection on 9/11, when a blind man stranded on the 78th floor of the World Trade Center’s 78th floor was guided to safety by his dog. And now, the movie can be linked to the sacrifice that was required to lower the veil to the spirit world. The narrator explains in this fascinating video, courtesy of Exposing Corruption. Please use your discretion.




Force Phantom

Hey kids (of all ages), it’s Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

Last week, we wandered into the realm of Hanna-Barbera’s SUPER FRIENDS. The various series in that franchise were a bit of a departure for HB, featuring characters owned by DC Comics. The studio’s closest competition in TV cartoons, Filmation, was more into licensed properties. In fact, they had pretty much made their start doing DC superheroes themselves.

Filmation’s 1960s DC superhero cartoons featured the JUSTICE LEAGUE, TEEN TITANS, with all their members, villains, and associated characters. They were produced in association with DC editorial, so they closely resembled the comic books. This would ultimately be the downfall of the shows, as the rock ’em, sock ’em action was decried by killjoy busybodies who were already wrecking TV in the late ’60s. (This is why the ’70s Super Friends series are so laughably neutered that actual super-villains weren’t even included in the first few iterations.)

As one might expect, Filmation’s DC superhero ‘toons started at the top, with SUPERMAN himself. Here seen in his first made-for-TV short from 1966. More from the OldHorseman.




 

The Matrix Scam Unravels

Thomas Althouse rejoins Sarah Westall to discuss the latest in the Matrix Corruption Scandal. For those of you who do not know the background, Thomas Althouse is the real creator and writer of the Matrix Trilogy. It was originally called The Immortals and he has all the proof.

This is a story of one of the largest film franchises is US history and how it was stolen; it’s a fraud. Truth is often stranger than fiction but we all know that by now. This story has intrigue and corruption at the highest levels of Hollywood including companies such as Warner Brothers and Disney and big names such as Michael Eisner, Steven Spielberg, the Wachowskis, Joel Silver and Keanu Reeves. They are all involved in this scam.

This is a two-part program. We present both videos here.







Joe Draws Nancy, Titanic Style

Nancy Pelosi gets comfortable on a coach, sucking down some Smirnoff Vodka as Joe Biden draws her, Titanic Style! For those of you who haven’t seen the blockbuster movie, that means she’s in the buff! But have no fear: Her ta-tas are blotted out, so this video is marginally safe for work. More from The United Spot.

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The Exterminator

Hey kids (of all ages), it’s Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

SCOOBY-DOO, WHERE ARE YOU? (Basically ersatz DOBIE GILLIS characters crossed with the old I LOVE A MYSTERY radio show plus a semi-anthropomorphic dog thrown-in for good measure.) was a big hit for the studio in 1969. Not only did it get a second production season, which was kinda’ rare for Saturday Morning Cartoons, but is spawned a slew of follow-up series, one-shot video features, and even big-budget live-action movie adaptations.

Scooby and the gang also became the go-to template for many of HB’s ‘toons through the ’70s, as YOGI BEAR had been for the ’60s. Just rename the Meddling Kids, and swap-out the dog for a semi-anthropomorphic car, phantom, cat, shark, or even a goofier-looking dog, and there’s your new show. Heck, even the Justice League got a pair of Meddling Kids and their dog when HB took over the superheroes’ license with SUPERFRIENDS.

Scooby’s second program, the NEW SCOOBY-DOO MOVIES, had the mystery adventures extended to an hour-long, and featured guest stars. And what a mixed-bad that lot was! Sometimes real people, like Cass Elliot, Davy Jones, or Jerry Reed, voiced by their real-world selves. Sometimes fictional characters, like Batman, the Addams Family, or the cast of other HB Scooby-esque cartoons. Sometimes a splitting of the difference, with the onscreen personas of real people voiced by impersonators, as with the THREE STOOGES and LAUREL AND HARDY due to the originals being retired or dead.

This October 1973 episode features Don Adams voicing himself in the style of his GET SMART character. For some reason, even though the kids recognize him as a TV star, he’s working as an exterminator trying to get rid of the termites in a haunted house so the bank can sell it. C’mon! His post Agent 86 career wasn’t THAT bad! More from the OldHorseman.




The Groping Munchkins Of Oz

Yup…Judy Garland says the “munchkins” were pretty handy. Although you may have seen the classic movie The Wizard of Oz, you’ve probably NEVER heard of the horrors that occurred behind the scenes while the film was being produced. The truth is DISTURBING, and in this documentary, we’re covering the horrors behind the creation of The Wizard of Oz.

While Judy Garland was arguably the most affected by the filming of the movie, Margaret Hamilton, original tin man Buddy Ebsen, and the remainder of the cast didn’t escape unscathed. This is truly a scary horror story behind a seemingly innocent and classic film. Join us as we cover the true dark backstory behind The Wizard of Oz.  More from Explore With Us.




Aladdin & His Wonderful Lamp

A few weeks back, we brought you the Cartoon Renewal Studios’ crisp new remastering of the classic Dave Fleischer cartoon Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s 40 Thieves. Today, we have the 1939 followup Aladdin And His Wonderful Lamp.

At 22 minutes, this is the longest of the original Popeye cartoons. And, in our opinion, it’s also the best of the three pictures spun around tales from the Arabian Nights, the other being Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor.

It’s hard to beat the Technicolor of the 1930s and 1940s, and Cartoon Renewal Studios has done a superb job restoring the richly textured and colored saturation.

Here, Popeye transforms into a sultan romancing Queen Olive Oyl, while battling an evil genie. It’s a retelling of the Aladdin story, setting the stage in a way that foretold Disney’s later version.

In this instance, Olive Oyl is the imagined screenwriter, concocting the adventure for Surprise Pictures. Wimpy is missing in action as is Bluto, but there’s plenty going on, as well as some memorable lines of dialogue.  As Popeye woos Olive, he exclaims, “I’ve never made love in Technicolor before!”

Hope you enjoy this classic brought back to life!

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From The Memory Hole

Hey kids (of all ages), it’s Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

Last week I featured Barney Bear, MGM’s first original cartoon star, created by Rudolph Ising. Of course, Ising and his partner Hugh Harman had been in the biz since the early silent era, working for Disney when young Walt was making Felix The Cat knockoffs in Kansas City, ultimately winding-up with him in California making Oswald the Lucky Rabbit pictures for Universal. Seeing how Walt lost Oswald to his distributors, Harman and Ising made sure to copyright their own character creation for themselves.

The character they created is of considerable importance to the history of American animation. But, due to the cancer of Political Correctness, has been downplayed and subjected to revision for decades. For, you see, Bosko was a little n*gger… Back in the 1980s I saw an early model sheet at a museum exhibit, and that’s exactly how he was identified on the page. (Minus the asterisk, which is for BitChute’s censors.)

A Negro caricature wasn’t considered offensive in the early 1930s, when people were too busy surviving the Depression to be a bunch of oversensitive snowflakes. Mickey Mouse and many other ‘toons were basically minstrel show blackface as well. But Bosko didn’t have the fig leaf of being a non-human in later years.

He was the first star of the LOONEY TUNES before Bugs, Daffy, or even Porky had been thought-of. When things went sour between Harman-Ising and the middle-man selling their shorts to Warner Bros., they were able to walk and take Bosko with them! They then used him in some of the HAPPY HARMONIES pictures they made for MGM distribution… Now with Bosko in color, for what little difference that made. His ’20s design didn’t benefit much from the added spectrum, and was becoming dated pretty quickly. So he got a major redesign…

And here’s where all the later apologists who claimed he was a “living inkblot” of no particular race, ethnicity, or even species fall on their faces. In ’35 Bosko got updated with far more realistic detail, and was undeniably a negro boy.

That redesign lasted just seven outings. But he got yet another over half a century later, when he and his girlfriend Honey made a comeback in an episode of TINY TOON ADVENTURES on TV. For that appearance, they retconned the couple into anthropomorphic animals of vague species.

Here are his first WB and MGM pictures, along with his 1935 MGM new look. More from the OldHorseman.




 

Wonderful World Of Color

Hey kids (of all ages), it’s Saturday Morning Cartoon time again!

Okay, cheating just a wee bit here, as this was originally from the other side of the weekend. BitChute viewer Alkaline777 requested the brainy uncle of a certain animated, white waterfowl a few weeks ago. So here’s the first appearance of Professor Ludwig Von Drake!

Uncle Walt’s showcase had already been a staple of Sunday evening TV programming for years before color broadcasting really started to catch-on. So he moved his series over to NBC, which was on the cutting edge of the technology. The premier on the network featured Walt’s first created-for-TV cartoon character, who served as a co-host. The first half of this episode is a veritable infomercial (decades before those became a thing) for color televisions… The leading manufacturer of which happened to be NBC’s parent corporation.

The second half features an Oscar-nominated educational-ish ‘toon from a couple years earlier starring Ludwig’s nephew. “Donald In Mathmagicland” is the very first in all of Disney’s stable of cartoon shorts to be aired on TV in color.

From September 1961. More from the OldHorseman.




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