Call Me Stormy

Finding righteous currents in turbulent times

Archive for the tag “Harry Truman”

Mystery Surrounds Navy Death

James Forrestal was the last Cabinet-level United States Secretary of the Navy and the first United States Secretary of Defense. Born in New York, he was the youngest son of Irish immigrants, an amateur boxer in his youth, and later nominated to be Undersecretary of the Navy by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1940, where he led the national effort for industrial mobilization for the war effort during World War II. He was named Secretary of the Navy in May 1944, and the first Secretary of the newly created Defense Department in 1947 by Roosevelt’s successor Harry S. Truman.

Forrestal was a supporter of naval battle groups centered on aircraft carriers, which brought him into a close relationship with Admiral Richard E. Byrd, an American naval officer and a pioneering American aviator, polar explorer, and organizer of polar logistics, becoming the first to lead expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic poles, as well as leading a massive post WW2 military force to invade Antarctica called Operation Highjump. So what happened to James Forrestal? More from Robert Sepehr.

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Communist Subversion of USA

American Betrayal is America’s lost history, a chronicle that pits Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight David Eisenhower, and other American icons who shielded overlapping Communist conspiracies against the investigators, politicians, defectors, and others (including Senator Joseph McCarthy) who tried to tell the American people the truth.

American Betrayal shatters the approved histories of an era that begins with FDR’s first inauguration, when “happy days” are supposed to be here again, and ends when we “win” the Cold War. It is here, amid the rubble, where Diana West focuses on the World War II–Cold War deal with the devil in which America surrendered her principles in exchange for a series of Big Lies whose preservation soon became the basis of our leaders’ own self-preservation. It was this moral surrender to deception and self-deception, West argues, that sent us down the long road to moral relativism, “political correctness,” and other cultural ills that have left us unable to ask the hard questions.

Diana West is a journalist and the author of The Death of the Grown-Up: How America’s Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization, American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation’s Character and The Rebuttal: Defending ‘American Betrayal’ from the Book-Burners. Here, she joins Stefan Molyneux for a fascinating discussion.




Thinking Man’s John Wayne

Comedian Jon Stewart once called Harry Truman a war criminal for ordering the atomic bombings of Japan during World War II, although Stewart later recanted his “stupid” remark after it elicited a firestorm of criticism. Today, on the 67th anniversary of Little Boy being dropped on Hiroshima, some more seasoned and veteran perspective on that historic event is offered by Jack H. McCall Jr., author of two companion histories of WWII. McCall says many of the soldiers fighting in the Pacific Theater kissed the ground upon hearing of Truman’s decision, knowing he had averted the deaths of more than one million GIs who likely would have been killed if a ground invasion of Japan had taken place.

One of McCall’s books examines the war through the perspective of Professor Christopher Donner, who McCall bills as “the thinking man’s John Wayne,” a trained historian fluent in multiple languages who nevertheless volunteered for the US Marines, serving in the fierce battles on Okinawa. Among Donner’s recollections: His fateful encounter with US Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner Jr., the son of a Kentucky governor and the highest-ranking US officer killed in combat during WWII.

McCall shares anecdotes from his books with Glenn Reynolds on PJTV’s InstaVision.

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